My Stupid Record Collection #4: Duane & Greg Allman - Duane & Greg Allman
Before today, I didn’t realize I owned this record nor did I even know it existed. My ignorance is a shame because this is a little gem of a late-60s southern rock record. Although some of the songs are of poor quality. It starts out strong with the Allman’s cover of “Morning Dew,” which is one of my favorite Grateful Dead covers. This is a great upbeat version that I instantly like. I have no idea who wrote this song. The back cover says it was written by Tim Rose and Bonnie Dobson. I’ve never heard of either of them. The rest of the album is solid but lackluster. There are a few bluesy numbers and a few southern stomps. An early sounding version of the Allman Brothers hit, “Melissa” closes out the first side. That’s a great song, but this isn’t really a great version. It’s a short record with only nine songs and after listening all the way through it’s clear that “Morning Dew” is definitely the standout track.
Side one
"Morning Dew" (Tim Rose, Bonnie Dobson) – 3:45
"God Rest His Soul" (Gregg Allman) – 3:55
"Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out" (Jimmy Cox) – 4:32
"Down in Texas" (Eddie Hinton, Marlon Greene) – 3:40
"Melissa" (Gregg Allman, Alaimo) – 3:15
Side two
"I’ll Change for You" (David Brown) – 2:57
"Back Down Home with You" (Brown) – 2:25
"Well I Know Too Well" (Alaimo) – 2:15
"In The Morning When I’m Real" (Robert Pucetti) – 2:40
OK, time for a quick Google to see what’s the backstory of this album.
Ahh, so this was a demo album recorded in 1968 with the Allman’s previous band, The 31st of February. That’s a hell of a band name. The planned album was never completed because the band broke up shortly after the recording of the demos. Duane and Gregg went on to form The Allman Brothers band a year later in 1969 and in 1972 Bold Records released these demos as an album. That explains the poor quality. Gregg’s name was misspelled on the album with only one “g” - I didn’t even notice this.
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Previous stupid record: 
The Allman Brothers - Eat A Peach

My Stupid Record Collection #4: Duane & Greg Allman - Duane & Greg Allman

Before today, I didn’t realize I owned this record nor did I even know it existed. My ignorance is a shame because this is a little gem of a late-60s southern rock record. Although some of the songs are of poor quality. It starts out strong with the Allman’s cover of “Morning Dew,” which is one of my favorite Grateful Dead covers. This is a great upbeat version that I instantly like. I have no idea who wrote this song. The back cover says it was written by Tim Rose and Bonnie Dobson. I’ve never heard of either of them. The rest of the album is solid but lackluster. There are a few bluesy numbers and a few southern stomps. An early sounding version of the Allman Brothers hit, “Melissa” closes out the first side. That’s a great song, but this isn’t really a great version. It’s a short record with only nine songs and after listening all the way through it’s clear that “Morning Dew” is definitely the standout track.

Side one

  1. "Morning Dew" (Tim Rose, Bonnie Dobson) – 3:45
  2. "God Rest His Soul" (Gregg Allman) – 3:55
  3. "Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and Out" (Jimmy Cox) – 4:32
  4. "Down in Texas" (Eddie Hinton, Marlon Greene) – 3:40
  5. "Melissa" (Gregg Allman, Alaimo) – 3:15

Side two

  1. "I’ll Change for You" (David Brown) – 2:57
  2. "Back Down Home with You" (Brown) – 2:25
  3. "Well I Know Too Well" (Alaimo) – 2:15
  4. "In The Morning When I’m Real" (Robert Pucetti) – 2:40

OK, time for a quick Google to see what’s the backstory of this album.

Ahh, so this was a demo album recorded in 1968 with the Allman’s previous band, The 31st of February. That’s a hell of a band name. The planned album was never completed because the band broke up shortly after the recording of the demos. Duane and Gregg went on to form The Allman Brothers band a year later in 1969 and in 1972 Bold Records released these demos as an album. That explains the poor quality. Gregg’s name was misspelled on the album with only one “g” - I didn’t even notice this.

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Previous stupid record: 

The Allman Brothers - Eat A Peach

Speaking of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Newsreal maker British Pathé just uploaded their entire archive of 85,000 historic films to YouTube yesterday. Among those clips is this amazing footage of the 1906 earthquake that was filmed what appears to be just a day or two after the quake. There are a lot of clear shots of still-standing buildings, but I haven’t been able to identify the location of any yet. Most of the video appears to be shot on Market Street.

Today marks the 108th anniversary of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Each year hundreds of San Francisco residents dress in vintage turn-of-the century clothing and gather at Lotta’s Fountain downtown, which was a meeting point after the 1906 quake, to commemorate the event.

People also gather each year around the “golden fire hydrant” at Church and 20th streets in the Mission District to paint the hydrant gold. Nearly 80% of San Francisco was destroyed by fire in the earthquake. According to local lore, this fire hydrant saved the entire neighborhood as it was the only hydrant in the area still working after the quake.

According to 7x7 Secret San Francisco:

As fires raged throughout the city, the Mission was in serious peril. All the fire hydrants were running dry and firefighter, along with the horse-drawn engines they used, were equally exhausted. Desperate residents came together at what is now Dolores Park to check the last single fire hydrant left in their neighborhood for water. Miraculously the hydrant at the top of the park (Church and 20th) was still functioning, and hundreds of people pulled fire engines up the Dolores hill to access this last fire hydrant when the engines’ horses couldn’t make it. After a seven-hour battle against the blaze, the people of the Mission and a few firefighters saved the neighborhood from total destruction.

In honor of their epic fight, the fire hydrant was painted gold. Every year on the anniversary of the earthquake, the hydrant receives a fresh coat of paint from the Fire Chief and local residents at 5:12 a.m. (the exact time of earthquake hit).

My Stupid Record Collection #3: The Allman Brothers - Eat A Peach

Alright, now were getting into the good stuff. This record is an original copy from 1972 and was one of the first albums I purchased when I started collecting vinyl. I think I bought it from a used vinyl store in Bakersfield. It’s a double album with typical early-70s psychedelic mushroom and fairy dust art inside the gatefold. It even has the original inner sleeve from 1972 that was printed to look like a record company fanzine called “The Inner Sleeve.” I did some quick Googling to try to find the backstory of “The Inner Sleeve,” but didn’t come up with anything.

I’m not the biggest Allman Brothers fan in the world (I’m more of a Skynyrd guy), but this album will always hold a special place in my heart. Every time I listen it, it immediately reminds me of the spring of 1998 when I was a freshman in college living in the dorms at Ohio University. This album was the official soundtrack of spring that year.

You couldn’t walk anywhere on campus without hearing it blaring from open windows of dorm rooms, boomboxes on the lawn, cars driving to Stroud’s Run - everywhere. You couldn’t avoid it.  The winters in Ohio are brutal and when the weather finally turns nice, people come out of the woodwork and start losing their minds. I remember we had a stretch of particularly magnificent weather for a week or so and one of those afternoons I made a phone call to a friend’s dorm (I think it was Chuck). His roommate’s answering machine picked up and was playing “Blue Sky” along with a message that said something like “Sorry, we’re out enjoying this beautiful day. You should be too.”

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Previous stupid record: 

After the Ball : A Treasury of Turn-of-the-Century Popular Songs

My Stupid Record Collection #2: After the Ball : A Treasury of Turn-of-the-Century Popular Songs
Sorry, folks. It looks like the second album in the My Stupid Record Collection series is also a dud. The good news is I’m 100% positive I didn’t spend any of my hard earned money on this record. Like the previous album reviewed, this one was also acquired from a sidewalk somewhere in the Lower Haight. I don’t specifically recall where, but it was likely in a pile of unwanted crap outside someone’s front door. It’s pretty common to come across piles of records, books, and other junk on the sidewalks in my neighborhood. It’s our way of giving back to the community.In all honesty, when I pulled this from my collection today I briefly considered throwing it in the trash instead of listening to it. However, after some careful consideration I felt like doing that would go against the spirit of this whole project. The goal here is to open my mind and explore albums and music that I ordinarily wouldn’t listen to.
The music here is a collection of various popular songs from the late-1800s and early 1900s, all sung by the same female opera singer. The music was recorded in 1974 and most of the songs are accompanied by piano. It’s all pretty terrible, but still listenable considering the songs are 115 years old. The only song title I recognize is “Meet Me In St. Louis,” but I think that’s because it’s also the name of a movie or musical or something. The music didn’t really ring any bells when I listened to it.

Would I listen to this record again? No. But I feel like it could potentially serve a purpose for something someday in the future so I won’t toss it in the trash just yet.
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Previous stupid record:
Al Jolson - The Greatest Of

My Stupid Record Collection #2: After the Ball : A Treasury of Turn-of-the-Century Popular Songs

Sorry, folks. It looks like the second album in the My Stupid Record Collection series is also a dud. The good news is I’m 100% positive I didn’t spend any of my hard earned money on this record. Like the previous album reviewed, this one was also acquired from a sidewalk somewhere in the Lower Haight. I don’t specifically recall where, but it was likely in a pile of unwanted crap outside someone’s front door. It’s pretty common to come across piles of records, books, and other junk on the sidewalks in my neighborhood. It’s our way of giving back to the community.

In all honesty, when I pulled this from my collection today I briefly considered throwing it in the trash instead of listening to it. However, after some careful consideration I felt like doing that would go against the spirit of this whole project. The goal here is to open my mind and explore albums and music that I ordinarily wouldn’t listen to.

The music here is a collection of various popular songs from the late-1800s and early 1900s, all sung by the same female opera singer. The music was recorded in 1974 and most of the songs are accompanied by piano. It’s all pretty terrible, but still listenable considering the songs are 115 years old. The only song title I recognize is “Meet Me In St. Louis,” but I think that’s because it’s also the name of a movie or musical or something. The music didn’t really ring any bells when I listened to it.

Would I listen to this record again? No. But I feel like it could potentially serve a purpose for something someday in the future so I won’t toss it in the trash just yet.

- - - 

Previous stupid record:

Al Jolson - The Greatest Of

Lately, I’ve been following My Husband’s Stupid Record Collection where the author of the blog sets out to listen to every album in her husband’s 1,500 record collection. She’s working her way through the collection alphabetically and writing a semi-lengthy review of each album. Since I usually try to listen to a vinyl album each Saturday and Sunday morning during our usual french press coffee and breakfast routine, I figured I might as well try to do something similar. I probably only actively listen to about 20% of the records my collection, so this will be a fun way for me to try to hear the entire collection. I have about 170 albums, so It should take me a little over three years if I listen to two albums a weekend. I’m notorious for starting blog projects and abandoning them after boredom sets in, so we’ll see how long this actually lasts.

My Stupid Record Collection #1: Al Jolson - The Greatest Of
We’re starting at the beginning of the alphabet and this is the first record in the A’s. It’s fitting that the first album reviewed is one I’ve never listened to before. Every once in a while, one of the record stores on Haight Street will dump a few crates of unwanted vinyl out on the sidewalk for scavengers to take for free. The crates are usually picked clean of all the decent records within an hour or two. I’ve been fortunate to stumble upon two or three of these record dumps and I believe this is how I acquired this album.
I’ve heard Al Jolson’s name plenty of times but I have to admint that I’m not very familiar with his music. I know he was an important figure in the early history of pop music and I believe that was the reason I grabbed this album.
At first listen, this is what I would consider standard 1920’s pop music. All of the songs are similar in that they feature Al crooning over slow orchestra and jazz music. The lyrics are saccharin and a little dopey. Al likes to sing about being on top of the world, being happy, being “Alabamy bound.” The only song I recognize on side one is “I’m Just Wild About Harry,” which I’ve heard other singers cover and parody. I’ve never heard Al’s version though.
Wanting to learn more, I pulled up Al Jolson on Wikipedia.

At the peak of his career, he was dubbed “The World’s Greatest Entertainer”.

This is somewhat surprising after listening to his music. In my mind, this is not the best 1920s/1930s pop I’ve heard. I’m not a huge fan of the tone of his voice and the way he delivers his lyrics. It’s very direct and forceful and sounds like he’s purposely over-singing everything. I’m guessing he was so wildly popular because he was a great entertainer - not so much because he made great records. Actually, this is a question I would have liked to ask my grandpa if he was still alive. I have a feeling he could have explained to me the hidden appeal of Al Jolson. This is one of those not-obvious things you lose with the loss of a grandparent. There’s no one around anymore who can explain Al Jolson.
Would I ever listen to this album again in the future? Probably not. I could see it maybe being interesting background music during cocktail hour. But I doubt I would ever come home from a long day at the office, crack a beer, and throw on that old Al Jolson record.

Lately, I’ve been following My Husband’s Stupid Record Collection where the author of the blog sets out to listen to every album in her husband’s 1,500 record collection. She’s working her way through the collection alphabetically and writing a semi-lengthy review of each album. Since I usually try to listen to a vinyl album each Saturday and Sunday morning during our usual french press coffee and breakfast routine, I figured I might as well try to do something similar. I probably only actively listen to about 20% of the records my collection, so this will be a fun way for me to try to hear the entire collection. I have about 170 albums, so It should take me a little over three years if I listen to two albums a weekend. I’m notorious for starting blog projects and abandoning them after boredom sets in, so we’ll see how long this actually lasts.

My Stupid Record Collection #1: Al Jolson - The Greatest Of

We’re starting at the beginning of the alphabet and this is the first record in the A’s. It’s fitting that the first album reviewed is one I’ve never listened to before. Every once in a while, one of the record stores on Haight Street will dump a few crates of unwanted vinyl out on the sidewalk for scavengers to take for free. The crates are usually picked clean of all the decent records within an hour or two. I’ve been fortunate to stumble upon two or three of these record dumps and I believe this is how I acquired this album.

I’ve heard Al Jolson’s name plenty of times but I have to admint that I’m not very familiar with his music. I know he was an important figure in the early history of pop music and I believe that was the reason I grabbed this album.

At first listen, this is what I would consider standard 1920’s pop music. All of the songs are similar in that they feature Al crooning over slow orchestra and jazz music. The lyrics are saccharin and a little dopey. Al likes to sing about being on top of the world, being happy, being “Alabamy bound.” The only song I recognize on side one is “I’m Just Wild About Harry,” which I’ve heard other singers cover and parody. I’ve never heard Al’s version though.

Wanting to learn more, I pulled up Al Jolson on Wikipedia.

At the peak of his career, he was dubbed “The World’s Greatest Entertainer”.

This is somewhat surprising after listening to his music. In my mind, this is not the best 1920s/1930s pop I’ve heard. I’m not a huge fan of the tone of his voice and the way he delivers his lyrics. It’s very direct and forceful and sounds like he’s purposely over-singing everything. I’m guessing he was so wildly popular because he was a great entertainer - not so much because he made great records. Actually, this is a question I would have liked to ask my grandpa if he was still alive. I have a feeling he could have explained to me the hidden appeal of Al Jolson. This is one of those not-obvious things you lose with the loss of a grandparent. There’s no one around anymore who can explain Al Jolson.

Would I ever listen to this album again in the future? Probably not. I could see it maybe being interesting background music during cocktail hour. But I doubt I would ever come home from a long day at the office, crack a beer, and throw on that old Al Jolson record.

stereogum:

Today marks the release of S. Carey’s spectacular Range Of Light. Carey is a member of Bon Iver, and he’s worked with Justin Vernon on other projects by Doe Paoro and Astronautalis, which got us thinking: That Justin Vernon gets around! Vernon’s been a serial collaborator since before Bon Iver even entered our collective radar, and SNL-impression-worthy rock stardom has only increased the number of circles he runs in. His output spans genres, aesthetics, and degrees of fame, to the point that it’s impossible to predict who he’ll link up with next. Vernon’s unmistakable voice has been spotted crooning about starfuckers on a Kanye track in Paris, churning out soft rock with underground mainstays Gayngs in Minneapolis, or gently guiding a traditional folk ballad by the Chieftains in Dublin. He’s been responsible for rugged garage rock with the Shouting Matches, expansive post-rock with Volcano Choir, and experiments verging on black metal with Colin Stetson. His sheer number of connections is baffling, and if you start to factor in all the connections to his connections, Kevin Bacon style, you’re going to need a map. So we made one with help from Michaela Schuett.
Behold the Justin Vernon family tree.

stereogum:

Today marks the release of S. Carey’s spectacular Range Of Light. Carey is a member of Bon Iver, and he’s worked with Justin Vernon on other projects by Doe Paoro and Astronautalis, which got us thinking: That Justin Vernon gets around! Vernon’s been a serial collaborator since before Bon Iver even entered our collective radar, and SNL-impression-worthy rock stardom has only increased the number of circles he runs in. His output spans genres, aesthetics, and degrees of fame, to the point that it’s impossible to predict who he’ll link up with next. Vernon’s unmistakable voice has been spotted crooning about starfuckers on a Kanye track in Paris, churning out soft rock with underground mainstays Gayngs in Minneapolis, or gently guiding a traditional folk ballad by the Chieftains in Dublin. He’s been responsible for rugged garage rock with the Shouting Matches, expansive post-rock with Volcano Choir, and experiments verging on black metal with Colin Stetson. His sheer number of connections is baffling, and if you start to factor in all the connections to his connections, Kevin Bacon style, you’re going to need a map. So we made one with help from Michaela Schuett.

Behold the Justin Vernon family tree.